Google CEO Pichai cancels 'town hall' on gender dispute

Sundar Pichai Google CEO

Ads criticizing Google over firing James Damore have been plastered on benches and bus stops near the company's office in Venice.

Google's Mountain View headquarters, along with other USA offices of the company, will be targeted in the August 19 event, Posobiec said.

The op-ed comes a day after Google CEO Sundar Pichai was supposed to hash it all out in an all-hands meeting with the company's more than 60,000 employees.

As controversy continues to swirl around James Damore, the Google engineer who was sacked after writing a memo about gender diversity at the company, the longtime New York Times columnist David Brooks has placed blame squarely on the shoulders of Google CEO Sundar Pichai. Google and Outfront didn't immediately return requests for more information.

In an essay published in The Wall Street Journal on Friday, Mr. Damore said "there was no outcry or charge of misogyny" when he shared the memo initially.

As a crisis unfurled at Google over an employee memo that argued biological factors helped explain the shortage of female engineers and leaders in Silicon Valley, some of the most pointed critiques of the company's handing of the issue were posted to its own message boards.

Google is also in the midst of a Department of Labor investigation into whether it pays women less than men, while Uber's CEO recently lost his job amid accusations of widespread sexual harassment and discrimination.

Damore concludes that "the viewpoint I was putting forward is generally suppressed at Google" but it was because of the "giant media controversy" that he was let go. But diversity numbers are barely changing.

"It saddens me to leave Google and to see the company silence open and honest discussion", he concluded.

Clearly Megan McArdle has a shallow understanding of the tech industry if she feels that all roles work with "inanimate objects" as she noted her in column "That Google memo about women in tech wasn't wrong".

Pichai earlier said parts of the 3,300-word manifesto crossed the line by "advancing harmful gender stereotypes" in the workplace.

"It's much easier for some to point to "innate biological differences" than to confront the unconscious biases and obstacles that get in the way of a level playing field", Stellings wrote in an email. Other men working in tech, it seemed, felt the same way he did.

One high-ranked question asked, according to Wired: "The doc asserted that Google has a lower bar for diversity candidates".

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