Paris shooting will 'probably help' far-right candidate Le Pen

President Donald Trump speaks to Associated Press Chief White House Correspondent Julie Pace in the Oval Office in Washington Wednesday

Meanwhile, investigators have released without charge three people detained over the shooting on Paris' Champs-Elysees, in which a policeman was killed.

Brandet later told BFM TV that a man with that name had turned himself in at a police station in Antwerp and was no longer being searched for in France. The Islamic State group claimed responsibility in a statement.

While in detention, he shot and wounded a prison officer after seizing his gun.

He was also convicted in 2003 of attempted murder in the shootings of two police officers. He, along with Foreign Minister Didier Reynders, offered his support to France which was struck by the attack just days before the first round of presidential elections.

Dozens of people lined up to vote Sunday inside the French Embassy in Cairo, where many expats work for French companies and schools. She said in a CNN interview after the US election in November that Trump's unexpected win could boost her own chances.

Anti-terrorism prosecutor Francois Molins said the note apparently fell out of the pocket of Karim Cheurfi, a 39-year-old with a criminal record, after he was shot dead.

Macron, a 39-year-old moderate, is presenting himself as a guarantor of the European Union, promising reform and appealing to pro-Europe sentiment among the French electorate. Its president, Mickael Bucheron, told AP the slain officer would have celebrated his 38th birthday at the beginning of May. France's interior ministry said the attacker was killed in the incident in the early evening on the world-famous boulevard. In the trunk of his vehicle, investigators found a black bag containing a pump-action shotgun, knives, scissors and a Koran, according to Molins. Cheurfi's identity was confirmed from his fingerprints. In November 2015, he took to Twitter to blame France's strict control laws for an Islamic State terror attack at multiple sites in Paris and its suburbs that left 137 people dead.

U.S. President Donald Trump predicted the attack in Paris "will have a big effect" on the French presidential election that begins this weekend, without naming which candidates he believed would benefit.

Three of the four presidential frontrunners - Le Pen, centrist Emmanuel Macron and conservative Francois Fillon - called off campaign events planned for Friday in the wake of the attack.

One of them, Marine Le Pen, the far-Right candidate, has issued grim warnings that a declining France is losing its identity, echoing Trump's themes during the American presidential race previous year.

While he stopped short of an outright endorsement, Trump applauded Le Pen, saying she is the candidate "strongest on borders, and she's the strongest on what's been going on in France".

"This war against us is ceaseless and merciless", she said, accusing the Socialist government of a "cowardly" response to the threat. But his health care bill didn't come up for a vote in the House, his travel ban was twice blocked in the courts and his West Wing has been plagued by infighting and the resignation of his first national security adviser amid an ongoing investigation into contacts between Trump aides and Russian officials. "This must be the priority", he said.

Police, who are still holding several members of his family for interviews, say that they are investigating if Cheurfi had accomplices.

IS had swiftly claimed the attack was carried out by one of its "fighters".

"She won't be able to protect our citizens", Macron said.

Candidates in the election said they had been warned about the Marseille attackers.

"Nothing must hamper this democratic moment, essential for our country", Cazeneuve said after a high-level meeting Friday that reviewed the government's security plans.

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