Government says Trump should be 'extended full courtesy of state visit'

British government rejects petition to cancel Donald Trump state visit signed by 1.8 million people

"During her visit to the United States on 27 January 2017, the Prime Minister, on behalf of Her Majesty the Queen, invited President Trump for a State Visit to the UK later this year".

The petition, which said Mr Trump should be allowed into the United Kingdom but not to make a state visit, came amid protests at his executive order preventing people from seven mainly-Muslim countries from entering the US.

Protests against the US President intensified after Mr Trump sought to impose a travel ban against citizens from seven predominantly Muslim countries, with tens of thousands of people taking to the streets of London.

The petitioners suggested that Trump should be allowed to enter Britain as the head of the U.S. government, but should not be invited for a state visit, which would involve a reception by Queen Elizabeth II. The invitation was accepted.

Those behind the petition were able to garner 1.8 million signatures.

The petition began after Prime Minister Theresa May visited Washington in the early days of Trump's presidency, and invited him to come on a state visit to Britain. "At this stage, final dates have not yet been agreed for the State Visit", it concluded.

The government said it recognized "the strong views expressed by the many signatories of this petition".

Commons Speaker John Bercow has been caught up in the row for saying that he was "strongly opposed" to an address by Mr Trump in Westminster Hall.

But the British government has said it will push ahead with plans for a Trump state visit.

Reuters reported Trump's state visit to the United Kingdom could take place around June, citing the outgoing chief of London's Metropolitan police.

Meanwhile, the president has been rocked by the resignation of his national security adviser, Michael Flynn, following reports that he misled White House officials about his contacts with Russian Federation.

The controversial invitation was announced by Theresa May, officially at the request of Buckingham Palace but directed by ministers, last month.

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